Historic Covered Bridges in Frederick County Md

Historic Covered Bridges in Frederick County Md

Frederick County is full of historic treasures.  On a sunny warm day I suggest packing a picnic lunch and taking your camera for a 2 or 3 hour adventure through northern Frederick County to see the 3 remaining historic covered bridges.  They are all located near Thurmont Maryland. Here’s my virtual tour of Historic Covered Bridges in Frederick County Md for you:

1. Utica Mills Covered Bridge

Utica Covered Bridge

Utica Mills Covered Bridge

Utica Mills Covered Bridge, at 101 feet the longest of the historic covered bridges, was originally built over the Monocacy River in 1843.

Historic covered bridges in Frederick County Md

Interior of Utica Mills Covered Bridge

It was washed out in June of 1889 by the same storm that caused the Johnstown Flood.  The people of Utica salvaged one of the two spans of the bridge and moved it to its present location on Utica Road.

In 1934 the flooring was reinforced with steel beams and a center pier was added for additional support.  The rafters were replaced in 1970.  It was rehabbed in 1979.  A lot of the tedious repair labor over the years was done manually using hand tools.

Utica Mills Covered Bridge is located on Utica Road, just a couple of miles North of Utica Regional Park.  The Frederick Tourism website has a great map.

Historic covered bridges in Frederick County Md

Historic Utica Mills Covered Bridge

2. Roddy Road Covered Bridge

Roddy Road Covered Bridge, the smallest of the historic covered bridges in Frederick County Md, at just under 40 feet, was built by the Roddy family in 1856.  It is located at the corner of Roddy Road and Roddy Creek Road, a half mile from U.S. 15, spanning Owens Creek.

Historic covered bridges in Frederick County Md

Roddy Road Covered Bridge

 

Steel beams were added under Roddy Road’s flooring for support sometime in the early 1930s and have been replaced twice because of corrosion.   The bridge was repainted to original historical standards in May of 1993.

Historic covered bridges in Frederick County Md

3. Loy’s Station Covered Bridge

Loy’s Station Covered Bridge was originally built c. 1860.  It’s span is 90 feet across Owens Creek at a popular fishing spot.  Across Old Frederick Road is Loy’s Station Park, a County park with playground, covered pavilion and a large field, great for group events or family picnics.

Historic covered bridges in Frederick County Md

Loy’s Staion Covered Bridge

At one time Western Maryland Railroad had a station stop at Loys, so the bridge became known as Loys Station Covered Bridge.  It was rehabbed in 1976 as part of the Bicentennial celebration.

Historic Covered Bridges

Inside view of Loy’s Covered Bridge

 

In 1991 a pickup truck was set on fire while in the bridge as part of an insurance fraud scheme. The local community began raising money for bridge reconstruction, which cost was nearly $300,000.  On June 25th, 1994 a celebration of the bridge rebuilding was held and on July 4, the bridge was officially opened to traffic.

Historic covered bridges in Frederick County Md

Historic Loy’s Station

All Three of the Historic Covered Bridges of Frederick County Md were added to the National Register of Historic Places on June 23, 1978.

Enjoy our beautiful Historic Covered Bridges. Don’t forget your camera!  Watch the video of Historic Covered Bridges in Frederick County, and see all of the pictures on my Flickr page, Frederick County Historic Attractions.

Enjoy, Karen

The Highland Group
eXp Realty
Frederick, Md
301-401-5119
isell4u2@msn.com

Karen Highland

I'm a real estate agent, real estate blogger, communications director, a wife, mom (empty nest - yay!), dog-lover, and wine-lover. Frederick Md is a great place to live, work and brag about! The Highland Group. 301-401-5119 Google

2 Comments:

  1. Have you been to these beautiful historic Frederick Maryland landmarks since the recent rain storms came through Karen?

    I really hope none of them had any damage

  2. I haven’t been back since, but each of the bridges are about 7 feet above the streams underneath. I would imagine it would take torrential downpours to damage them.

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